Kevin Edzant's English 312 Blog

May 17, 2010
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Being Jewish is more than just following the Jewish faith. Being Jewish implies a shared identity, an identity where regardless of nationality, a shared experience and common ancestry can connect Jews in Israel with Jews in America.  In his essay about American Jewish Culture, Jonathan D. Sarna discusses a “cult of synthesis,” or the “belief that Judaism and Americanism reinforce one another” (Sarna 52). The “cult of synthesis,” or the merging of the two cultures, can be looked at as an assimilation of the two cultures where Jews could be “both American and Jewish” (Sarna 72). But this belief began to dissolve during the late 1960’s, which was a turbulent time for American politics and culture. Artists and intellectuals began to question the cultural identity of the Jews in the 1960’s. Some Jewish filmmakers and authors examined the cult of synthesis in their works in an unorthodox way.

For these authors and filmmakers, the criticism takes a comedic form. Jerry Seinfeld, a popular Jewish stand-up comic,  wrote and starred in the television series, Seinfeld, about a group of Jewish friends living in New York. The Coen Brothers film, A Serious Man is a black-comedy. Woody Allen’s Annie Hall, is a romantic comedy, and Philip Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint is in large part comedic prose. The comedy provides a method from which the artist can offer criticisms of the Jewish identity. Sigmund Freud calls these “tendentious” jokes, that is, jokes that have a purpose (Freud 107). In the context of these novels and films, the purpose is to deconstruct the idea that Judaism and Americanism can be reconciled.

These jokes are cynical. They mock the “cult of synthesis” that has attempted to define the Jewish American culture. “The object of [cynical] jokes attack,” Freud argues, “may equally be institutions…dogmas of morality or religion, views of life which enjoy so much respect that objections to them can only be made under the mask of a joke” (Freud 127). In other words, the jokes made by these novelists and filmmakers is the only way that they can criticize their culture; any other way would be too controversial and would thus be too distracting. Through their jokes they can attempt to provide a solution to the problem of assimilation. Their ultimate conclusion, however, is not one of reconciliation, but one of separation.

The two cultures attempting to be reconciled are distinctly American and distinctly Jewish. American culture stresses confidence, individualism, and a forward looking ethos. American heroes are often great athletes, those that not only play their respective sport well, but know they play it well. These heroes are often the leaders of the team, sometimes to the exclusion of other teammates. These athletes exude confidence and the power of the individual; furthermore, they reflect the values of the American culture. Forward thinking is a staple of the American mindset as well. New technologies, always greater than the ones before are emerging and being consumed. Since the 1960’s, social mores have lessened and become less strict. Taboo subjects such as sex are being discussed more freely, not just in the home, but also in public.

This is a large contrast to the Jewish culture which is steeped in tradition and community. To the Jew, and the Jewish culture, the community not only includes their immediate neighbors and family, but also other Jews. A Jewish man living in New York shares a common cultural connection with a Jewish woman living in Israel.  Each will share in the same cultural practices and share the cultural identity. The reason for this large community where the individual is deemphasized is because of the Jewish tendency to focus on the past. “A Jew anywhere is what he is because of the centuries of Diaspora existence experienced by his people,” writes Simon Herman. “The Jewish people is a group with a particularly long memory, and this has contributed in no small measure to the preservation of its distinctiveness across the centuries” (Herman 47). This focus on the past is a main tenant of the Jewish culture. Their holidays, Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, Passover, and Hanukkah, are all traditional holidays that have not changed in practice or meaning in thousands of years.

Portnoy’s Complaint raises several criticisms about the assimilation of the Jewish and American cultures. The novel is told from the perspective of Alex Portnoy, a Jewish man reflecting upon his childhood to a psychoanalyst. The novel, told in a stream-of-consciousness style, is considered shocking and, at times, vulgar. The humor in the novel is mostly taken from Alex Portnoy unreliability as a narrator. His stories are shocking and so absurd that they are often comedic. Alex, who grows in New York City to an overbearing mother, fantasizes as a young boy as being a baseball star. He idolizes Joe DiMaggio and Duke Snider. He dreams to have his at-bats called by Red Barber.  Portnoy exclaims, “Every little detail so thoroughly studied and mastered, that is is simply beyond the realm of possibility for any situation to arise in which I do not know how to move, or where to move…and there are people who feel in life the ease…the simple and essential affiliation with what is going on” (Roth 72).

Philip Roth’s use of baseball as an outlet for Portnoy’s fantasies is significant in several ways. The first is that the baseball diamond becomes a substitute for Americanism, and the players a substitute for Americans. This is understandable: baseball is called America’s Pastime and is one of the most popular spectator sports.  The diamond is filled with extremely talented and confident individuals, each knowing his own part of the team. The metaphor takes on additional significance with a realization of Alex Portnoy. After discussing those  “people who feel in life the ease…the simple and essential affiliation with what is going on,” Portnoy continues, “Why can’t I be one?” (72). The implication is that Portnoy, a Jew, lacks the self-confidence and the talent to become a good ballplayer, or if the metaphor is continued, a good American.

The novel also criticizes the tradition of Judaism and the Jewish culture. When Alex Portnoy is fourteen, he has an argument with his father over one of the Jewish holidays. When Alex refuses to observe the traditions, his father screams at him: “Tell me, now that you are all finished at fourteen being a Jew, do you know a single thing about the wonderful history and heritage of the saga of your people?” (Roth 62-63). Alex retorts, “You’re the ignorant one! You!” (63). The exchange between the father and son reflects a deeper meaning to a simple family spat. The implication is that the Jewish culture is deeply seated in history and tradition, an attitude which sets the culture apart from America.

Woody Allen is one of the foremost Jewish directors. His filmmaking career spans decades and genres. One of his most critically acclaimed pieces is the Academy Award winning Annie Hall, a romantic comedy between an uptight New Yorker, Alvy Singer, and a carefree artist, Annie Hall. Alvy Singer, played by Woody Allen, shares similar qualities to Alex Portnoy: both are neurotic and both are Jewish. Alvy constantly looks for excuses and is often self-deprecating. He describes his personality as “a little nervous,” a sign that he lacks confidence in himself, a trait that Alex Portnoy shares as well.

Part of the films success is due in large part to the film’s style. Told out of chronological order, the film follows the relationship between Annie and Alvy as Alvy thinks of it. At several moments in the film, the characters actually watch themselves and provide commentary. The result is largely comedic. In Annie Hall, the humor is often situational and absurd, but even this humor serves a larger purpose. In one such scene, Alvy Singer has been dating Annie for several month when he is invited over to her house for Easter lunch. Alvy sits next to Annie’s grandmother, “a classic Jew hater.” Alvy remarks that Jew haters “really look American,” and they “are nothing like [his] family.” By associating hating Jews as being American, Woody Allen is separating the two cultures and making them irreconcilable.

His critique of the two cultures is even more apparent when he shows Annie’s “America” family and Alvy’s “Jewish” family eating side by side. One is quiet and subdued, the other is cacophonous. This contrast is played for laughs, but as Freud talks about, jokes can be used to critique a cultural bias. The two cultures, American and Jewish is literally separated. The attempt to reconcile the two cultures only ends in Alvy pointing out that “the two are like water and oil.” Water and oil do not mix, and by Woody Allen literally creating and separating the two cultures, neither does Americanism and Judaism.

Seinfeld, a popular comedy series produced in the 1990s, was created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, well known Jewish comedians and writers. Although Seinfeld was frequently about “nothing,” larger themes of Judaism crept through. Jerry’s closest friend, George Costanza, is Jewish. George shares several key traits with Alvy and Alex Portnoy in that he too is neurotic and lacks any self-confidence. George is often portrayed as inept, and in an episode where he attempts to get fired, “feels like [he] can’t do anything wrong and that he “fail[s] at failing.” In The Muffin Tops, George works on the front office staff of the New York Yankees, a well known baseball team. George is traded by the Yankees to a company that makes “alcoholic chicken.” George, representing the Jewish culture is taken advantage of by a Baseball team which, as in Portnoy’s Complaint, represents American culture.

In one episode entitled The Yada Yada, Jerry’s dentist converts to Judaism and promptly makes a Jewish joke. The joke offends Jerry, who thinks that his doctor “converted to Judaism just for the jokes.” Jerry’s discomfort stems from the Jewish self-deprecation tradition of jokes; only Jews can make Jewish jokes. This discomfort, taken to its ultimate height, results in Jerry becoming an “anti-Dentite” (one who is prejudiced against dentists).

The Yada Yada

This reversal of roles (anti-Dentite is a clever pun on anti-Semite) puts the argument of the comedian in a larger perspective – Jerry associates Dentistry as separate from being Jewish. Dentistry is treated as separate culture, much like being Jewish is a separate culture. His discomfort of associating Judaism with “those people” is masked by a series of Dentist jokes. Thus one of the most lucrative jobs in the American health system is being distanced from the Jewish culture. The jokes, while meant to be funny, seem to convey that being Jewish cannot be (and should not be) reconciled with other cultures. The only way to make Jewish jokes is to be Jewish, and nothing else.

A Serious Man, a film about Larry Gopnik, a Jewish professor, losing his wife and faith, also criticizes the assimilation of the two cultures. Like Alex Portnoy, feelings of self-doubt afflict Larry as well. In an effort to find answers for his misery, Larry talks to a young Rabbi about his problems. “I feel like the carpet’s been yanked out from under me. I don’t know which end is up. I’m not even sure how to react; I’m so confused,” he laments. The young Rabbi tells him to find solace in the parking lot.

Self-doubt appears in the film as an entirely Jewish affliction; none of the “goyim” in the film lack confidence or anxiety. Gar Brant, the next door neighbor of Larry is a tough and burly man. Gar goes hunting with his son for deer, and in a dream sequence, for Jews. Gar is large and tough, and visibly frightens Larry. Gar is the confident and independent man, a contrast to the self-doubting Larry. Gar is distinctly American while Larry is not. The film also portrays other nationalities as far more confident than Larry.  Clive Park, a Korean student of Larry’s is cryptic and vague when he speaks, but has more confidence than Larry does. Additionally, Clive’s father exhibits confidence and even succeeds in flustering Larry. This contrast between Jews and non-Jews (Jewish Culture and American Culture) is an argument against the assimilation between the two.

Additionally, just as Portnoy’s Complaint criticized Jewish culture as being too steeped in history, A Serious Man offers a criticism of the faith itself. Another Rabbi tells Larry the story of a Jewish dentist who found the phrase “Help Me” inscribed (in Hebrew) in a non-Jewish clients mouth. The Rabbi concludes the story by telling Larry that he has no idea what it means. “[God] hasn’t told me [the answers],” the Rabbi says. This vagueness is played for laughs in the film, but it also provides a criticism of the faith. The film asks the question: If the Rabbi himself does not know the answers, does the faith itself provide any? The question contradicts the Jewish faith, which is an integral part of the Jewish Identity. A Serious Man goes one step further. In the same scene, after the Rabbi is finished telling Larry the story, Larry asks, “What happened to the goy?” The Rabbi responds, “The goy? Who cares?” This last comment further illustrates the divide between Jewish Culture and American Culture. Not only does the scene question the Jewish faith itself, but the last remark is the most blatant example of being unable to reconcile the two cultures. By not showing an interest in the goy, the Rabbi shows no interest in the culture of the goy, and by extension, the American Culture.

The Goy’s Teeth

The Jewish culture, as exemplified by these films and novels, is one of self-doubt and an inhibiting sense of tradition. Most of the Jewish characters in the films and novel lack confidence and tact. They represent the Jewish culture and serve to contrast it to the American culture. Several times in these works Americans are presented as supremely confident, sometimes using baseball as a metaphor for American culture. The confident individual triumphing over the self-doubting character. But in all of these examples comedy is used to not only make the audience or reader laugh, but also to provide a mode in which to discuss the relationship between Jewishness and Americanism. The comedy, which can be subtle or overt, can obfuscate the message from the tendentious meaning it serves.

If the Jewish culture is questioned, then by extension the relationship it has with the American culture must be questioned too. Each work examines the identity of being Jewish in different ways. Seinfeld questions the cultural makeup of a Jew and arrives a the conclusion that a Jew can be nothing else but Jewish. Portnoy’s Complain and A Serious Man, both criticize the culture and the Jewish faith. Woody Allen, in Annie Hall literally separates the two cultures. Thus the author and writers of each piece attempt to answer the question of the Jewish Identity and reconcile it with the American Identity. This cult of synthesis, or melting of the two cultures is examined thoroughly and the response is comedic. But in each work, the answer remains the same: To be Jewish is to be Jewish, and nothing else.

Works Cited:

Ackerman, Andy. “The Muffin Tops.” Seinfeld. Prod. Jerry Seinfeld. NBC. 8 May 1997. Television

Annie Hall. Dir. Woody Allen. Perf. Woody Allen and Diane Keaton. United Artists, 1977. DVD.

A Serious Man. Dir. Joel and Ethan Coen. By Joel and Ethan Coen. Perf. Michael Stuhlbarg, Richard Kind. Focus Features, 2009. DVD.

Crittenden, Jennifer. “The Millennium.” Seinfeld. Prod. Jerry Seinfeld. NBC. 1 May 1997. Television.

Freud, Sigmund. Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious. Trans. James Strachey. New York: Norton, 1989. Print.

Herman, Simon N. Jewish Identity: a Social Psychological Perspective. New Brunswick, N.J., U.S.A.: Transaction Pub., 1989. Print.

Melman, Peter, and Jill Franklyn. “The Yada Yada.” Seinfeld. Prod. Jerry Seinfeld. NBC. 27 Apr. 1997. Television.

Philip., Roth,. Portnoy’s Complaint. New York: Vintage International, 1994. Print.

Sarna, Jonathan D. “The Cult of Synthesis in American Jewish Culture.” Jewish Social Studies, New Series 5.1 (1999): 52-79. JSTOR. Web. 10 Feb. 2010.


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this is a test to see if I can post-date the blog.

April 12, 2010
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I am not a Bad Man

March 9, 2010
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Well, last Wednesday my group and I presented our presentation on Crime and Punishment. I was dreading the presentation, not because I am afraid of public speaking (I swear, I’m not afraid) but because I wasn’t sure how our idea would go over in class. Someone in our group, I’m not naming names, decided it would be (correctly) awesome to give our presentation with sock puppets. I’m not sure where this inspiration came from, but I do know this: It was pretty strange.

So there we were, sitting in the back of class discussing Crime and Punishment with sock puppet representations of the characters. My character was Luzhin, one of the most despicable characters in a novel full of despicable characters. For my presentation I gave a monologue from Luzhin’s perspective on his perception of himself. As per the assignment I had to first relate it to an outside text. I chose There Will Be Blood.

I used the Marxist critical approach to related the Character of Luzhin to Daniel Plainview to the novel. I think my comparison was a bit weak, but I couldn’t think of anyone else at the time I wrote the monologue. It was fun to get inside the mind of the character and I thought it was easy. As a screenwriter it’s what I do.

The best part about the presentation was hearing the others analyze their character. There were some really good insights into the characters and novels, and I found it fascinating. Leanna, or Raskolnikov, related him to a character from the show Criminal Minds, John, or Dunya, related her to the strong willed women in Woody Allen films. All very fascinating comparisons.

The only thing left to do is what and see if the other groups can top us now.

Song of the Day: If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out


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You Gotta Have Heart

February 25, 2010
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Right now we are reading the novel, Crime and Punishment. Our professor made a connection between Raskolnikov and Patrick Bateman, from American Psycho. While reading the book, I noticed another similarity between Raskolnikov and another literary figure.

The short story, The Tell Tale Heart (possibly my favorite American short story), written by Edgar Allen Poe (possibly my favorite American short story writer) is about a man who murders a man he lives with. After the carefully planned murder, the man (who is never named) hides the body under his floorboards. When the police come to investigate the murder the man is driven nuts by the “beating of the mans heart.” He is driven nuts by his own guilt and eventually confesses to the murder.

Crime and Punishment (1866) was written after The Tell Tale Heart (1843) but both stories deal with murder and and the guilty conscience of the murderer. I’m not sure if Dostoyevski was influenced by Poe’s short story, but the similarities are little eerie. Both characters have attention to detail, both characters murder someone, both characters are driven mad by their conscience.

If we compare both of these characters to Patrick Bateman from American Physco, then we have a real fun on time on our hands. Patrick is a character with not remorse and no feelings. When he murders someone it is merely to exercise his power over others. Raskolnikov murders because he is trying to make the world a better place. The man in The Tell Tale Heart murders because he is driven insane by an old man’s “vulture” eye.

The comparisons may not be perfect, but I think the similarities are interesting. Maybe I will bring this up for debate in my presentation on Wednesday.

Song of the Day: Sympathy for the Devil – The Rolling Stones.


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Separating Judaism and Americanism: Portnoy’s Complaint and A Serious Man

February 10, 2010
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Being Jewish is more than just following the Jewish faith. Being Jewish implies a shared identity, an identity where, regardless of nationality, a shared experience and common ancestry can connect Jews in Israel with Jews in America.  In his essay about American Jewish Culture, Jonathan D. Sarna discusses a “cult of synthesis,” or the “belief that Judaism and Americanism reinforce one another” (Sarna 52). The “cult of synthesis,” or the merging of the two cultures, can be looked at as an assimilation of the two cultures where Jews could be “both American and Jewish” (Sarna 72). But this belief began to dissolve during the late 1960’s, which was a turbulent time for American politics and culture. Artists and intellectuals began to question the cultural identity of the Jews and decades later, they are still struggling to find the answer. Two works, Portnoy’s Complaint, a novel by Philip Roth, and A Serious Man, a film written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, attempt to answer the question of Jewish identity, and both arrive at the same conclusion: It can not be reconciled with the American identity.

Portnoy’s Complaint raises several criticisms about the assimilation of the Jewish and American cultures. The novel is told from the perspective of Alex Portnoy, a Jewish man reflecting upon his childhood. When Alex is fourteen, he has an argument with his father over one of the Jewish holidays. When Alex refuses to observe the traditions, his father screams at him: “Tell me, now that you are all finished at fourteen being a Jew, do you know a single thing about the wonderful history and heritage of the sage of your people?” (Roth 62-63). Alex retorts, “You’re the ignorant one! You!” (Roth 63). The exchange between the father and son reflects a deeper meaning simple family spat. The implication is that the Jewish culture is deeply seated in history and tradition, an attitude which sets the culture apart from America, and thus the Jewish Identity apart from American Identities. Portnoy also laments the persistent self-doubt that plagues him and other Jews. “There are people who feel in life the ease…the simple and essential affiliation with what is going on. Why can’t I be one?” (Roth 72). The implication is that Jews cannot be part of the American culture because they are plagued with self-doubt and guilt, something that is distinctly non-America.

A Serious Man, a film about Larry Gopnik, a Jewish professor, losing his wife and faith, also criticizes the assimilation of the two cultures. Alex Portnoy, feelings of self-doubt afflict Larry as well. In an effort to find answers for his misery, Larry talks to a young Rabbi about his problems. “I feel like the carpet’s been yanked out from under me. I don’t know which end is up. I’m not even sure how to react; I’m so confused,” he laments. Self-doubt appears in the film as an entirely Jewish affliction; none of the “goyim” in the film lack confidence or anxiety. This contrast between Jews and non-Jews (Jewish Culture and American Culture) is an argument against the assimilation between the two. Additionally, just as Portnoy’s Complaint criticized Jewish culture as being too steeped in history, A Serious Man offers a criticism of the faith itself. Another Rabbi tells Larry the story of a Jewish dentist who found the phrase “Help Me” inscribed (in Hebrew) in a clients mouth. The Rabbi concludes the story by telling Larry that he has no idea what it means. “[God] hasn’t told me [the answers],” the Rabbi says. This vagueness is played for laughs in the film, but it also provides a criticism of the faith. The film asks the question: If the Rabbi himself does not know the answers, does the faith itself provide any? The question contradicts the Jewish faith, which is integral in the Jewish Identity. If the Jewish Identity is question, then by extension the relationship it has with the American Identity must be questioned too. A Serious Man and Portnoy’s Complaint both call into question the very identity Judaism and both arrive at the same conclusion: To be Jewish is to be Jewish.

Works Cited:

A Serious Man. Dir. Joel and Ethan Coen. By Joel and Ethan Coen. Perf. Michael Stuhlbarg, Richard Kind. Focus Features, 2009. DVD.

Philip., Roth,. Portnoy’s complaint. New York: Vintage International, 1994. Print.

Sarna, Jonathan D. “The Cult of Synthesis in American Jewish Culture.” Jewish Social Studies, New Series 5.1 (1999): 52-79. JSTOR. Web. 10 Feb. 2010.



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“Portnoy’s Complaint” or “How is this Considered Literature?”

January 27, 2010
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No. Seriously. When I first saw that we had to read the novel I was excited. Several months ago I looked up Time Magazine’s list of 100 Greatest English Language Novels since 1923 and vowed that one day I would read all of them. I had read several novels on the list already with a list of several more on the way. So, when I found out that we had to read Portnoy’s Complaint I remembered that it too was on the list. Thus my excitement.

Well, I started reading the book over Winter Break and was immediately shocked by the language. I wasn’t expecting to read a stream of consciousness novel. The subject matter was a bit unusual but it hit a little close to home. The stories (before the discussion of masturbating) seemed like the ones my dad would tell me about his mother.

Then came the masturbating. No, I wasn’t masturbating while reading the book, that would be inappropriate. Rather, Alex Portnoy was masturbating. A lot. I vaguely knew the book was about a man’s sexual frustrations and his fetishes. I expected some candid “sex talk”, but nothing prepared for his recounting of using his sister’s bra as a way of enacting a fantasy.

I knew when the book was first published so I guess I shouldn’t have been too surprised about the candor of the prose, after all, it was a product of its time. That is to say that the novel was written during the 1960’s when the counterculture movement was in full swing. The counterculture movement of the 1960’s was more than just a time for drugs and hippies and really good music, a sexual revolution was taking place. During this sexual revolution, previous taboos about sex were dismantled and new, frank discussions were taking place. The effects were found, not only in the actions of the countercultural revolutionaries, but also in the arts. More daring films like Bonnie and Clyde were known for their violence and sexuality. And novels like Portnoy’s Complaint were byproducts of the new revolution.

I knew the historical context of the novel before I started reading it, but that still doesn’t diminish the shock of actually reading it. Personally, I find the relationship between Alex and his parents to be far more interesting. Although I’m not Jewish, my grandmother is, and a lot of the antics his mother pulls, my grandmother does. In that respect, I have nothing but sympathy for Alex. I feel bad for the kid but at the same time, I feel incredibly lucky; I dodged a HUGE bullet.

I am about ein hundert (one hundred) pages in right now, so I still a ways to go, but I just thought I’d share my thoughts on the novel so far. My next entry will be focusing on Woody Allen again and possibly relating the novel some of his work.

Song of the day:  To The End by Blur


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Hello Again World!

January 21, 2010
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First off, let me say that I am not new to blogging. In fact, I have a blog that no one, not even my imaginary friend, reads. It used to be a place where I could vent my anger, discuss my favorite music, keep my (imaginary) friend up to date with my poker related exploits, and, of course, muse on the politics of the United States. Alas, that blog has since been abandoned, with very little chance of survival.

Now, lets have a little FAQ.

Question: “Why are you creating a new blog, after you have already proven yourself to be adept making them fail?”

Answer: “Because my previous blog was not about Woody Allen, everyone’s favorite New York Jew.” Well, he’s my second favorite after Jerry Seinfeld, but a blog about him would be about nothing.

Question: “What is the Purpose in creating a Blog about Woody Allen? Why do you think People will read It? Why are all the Nouns in the Sentence capitalized?”

Answer: “So I can get A in my English 312 class. Because They have to. Because the Germans do.”

Question: “What makes you qualified to write about Woody Allen? Why should I pay attention to anything you have to say about him?”

Answer: “I never claimed myself to be an expert on Woody Allen’s life or his cinema. I have seen two and a half of his films ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Purple Rose of Cairo,’ and part of ‘Whatever Works.’ For the most part, any discussion about Woody Allen or his work will be primarily my opinion and occasionally the opinions of others. I will properly cite any and all ideas that are not mine.”

Question: “What is with the URL? What does mehrapfel mean?”

Answer: “Mehr Äpfel translates into ‘more apples’ from German. That shortens into mehrapfel because I couldn’t include spaces and the Ä. I added the “n” because I could. The inspiration comes from a note in my notebook that says ‘Ich habe weniger Äpfel als mein Lehrer.’

Question: “Was machst du gern?”

Answer: “Apart from making creepy comments about professors in German, I like to play poker, I listen to music and I like to watch and make films. I am currently a screenwriting major. I am currently learning German and I work at the Apple Store. But above all else, I think that Christopher Walken is the best thing to happen to the planet since Humphrey Bogart.”

This actually leads to my favorite moment in a Woody Allen film. This is from “Annie Hall,” which won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1977. Annie Hall follows the roller coaster romance of Alvie, a neurotic and insecure man played by Woody Allen, and Annie Hall, a free spirited young woman, played by Diane Keaton. Christopher Walken has a brief role as Annie’s younger brother, Duane.

If you need to contact me, my email address is kedzant@mac.com.

Song of the day: Maxwell’s Silver Hammer by the Beatles.


About author

I'm Kevin. I am a student at CSUN, the CalState in the nation. I am a screenwriting major. I am currently working on an adaptation of Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six. I work at the Apple Store where I sell computers and iPhones and iPods. I'm also something of a card shark, so if you ever see me sit down at a poker table with you, pick up your money and run.

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